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A holistic strategy of prevention, protection, prosecution and partnership is necessary to combat violence, abuse, neglect and exploitation of people with disability.

Prevention People with disability should not find themselves in situations where they have a heightened risk of violence, abuse, neglect and exploitation simply because they are people with disability. Institutional settings provide the most documented cases of heightened risk.

Protection People with disability must be served by legislative frameworks that uphold their right to be free from violence and abuse. For example, domestic violence legislation which recognises that perpetrators can also include carers, or co-residents of people with disability who live in institutions. Policies should leave no room for perverse outcomes such as housing support options that result in segregated accommodation.

Prosecution Violence, abuse, neglect and exploitation against people with disability must beinvestigated and prosecutedto the same extent asfor people without disability, and people with disability must be supported to participate in proceedings as victims, defendants and witnesses.

Partnership Disability support providers, the police, the justice system, domestic violence and mainstream services must work in harmony to ensure that the response to abuse is quick, adequate and that there are clear pathways to address prevention, protection and prosecution of abuse.

It is well documented that people with disability experience significantly higher levels of violence, abuse, neglect and exploitation. For example:

Women and girls with disability are overrepresented as victims of rape and sexual assault: In 2011, a quarter of rape cases reported by females in Australia were perpetrated against women with disability, and it is estimated that up to 70 per cent of women with psychosocial disability in Australia have experienced past sexual abuse including child sexual assault.

Police and lawyers frequently do not investigate and prosecute incidents of abuse as crime, meaning that people with disability have no mechanism for justice or redress: This can be due to attitudinal barriers including a lack of disability awareness and a failure to recognise people with disability as reliable witnesses. The result is that people with disability are more likely to experience multiple episodes of abuse because perpetrators perceive little likelihood of sanction or police intervention if caught.

The law in Australia allows for the non-therapeutic sterilisation of children with disability, and of adults with disability without their full and informed consent: This is an egregious form of human rights abuse which various UN bodies have identified as constituting violence and/or torture.

There is no national framework that addresses the use of restricted practices (seclusion, chemical, mechanical and physical restraint) against people with disability: A framework must be introduced which is in line with prevailing international human rights norms. Restrictive practices carried out by persons such as carers, teachers, or boarding house operators for example can constitute assault and should be treated accordingly by the police.

Institutional living arrangements such as social care homes, licenced boarding houses and some forms of group homes create environments where violence and abuse can occur with impunity:  By their nature, institutional living arrangements reduce privacy, choice and autonomy, increase isolation and segregation and foster relationships of confinement and dependency; they are breeding grounds for abusive relationships and silent suffering behind closed doors. It is vital that the social and economic structures that compel people to live in these congregate living arrangements are broken down, and that people with disability are supported to live in the community. Redeveloping institutions so that they are smaller (e.g. cluster housing), in materially better conditions (e.g. contemporary supported accommodation facilities) or located closer to large towns and cities does not reduce the risk of abuse of people with disability.

Mainstream services are not equipped to assist people with disability fleeing abuse: A person may be restricted from using domestic violence, housing, refuge, or shelter services because policies deny them access, buildings and transport is inaccessible, interpreters are not provided or support needs are not met.

People with disability are exploited financially by people intended to support them: Family members, carers and guardians are often in a position to appropriate funds from a person with disability either without their knowledge or frequently without their informed consent. This financial abuse makes the person with disability dependent and commonly leads to instances of neglect.

Key Recommendations

  • Prohibit further funding which is directed at maintaining or developing institutional living arrangements for people with disability.
  • Implement best practice prevention measures aimed at ending violence and abuse experienced by people with disability. These should include education programs targeted at providers of disability and domestic violence supports and services, and for people in a position to identify and help victims of abuse such as social workers, carers, health care professionals, police and disability service staff.
  • Establish an independent, statutory, national protection mechanism that has broad functions and powers to protect, investigate and enforce findings related to situations of violence, abuse, neglect and exploitation experienced by people with disability.
  • Develop a national framework that addresses the use of restrictive practices. This should include a monitoring mechanism.
  • Funding to mainstream services which support people fleeing violence and abuse should include performance indicators around making their services and facilities accessible and inclusive.
  • Introduce legislation prohibiting the non-therapeutic sterilisation of people with disability without their full and informed consent.

 Stop the Abuse Word 101kb

It is estimated that 20% of Australians are people with a disability. Yet historically, we have been shut out of civic life, the community and jobs. Hindered by negative attitudes, unimaginative programs, and inaccessible transport, buildings and information, people with disability in Australia have been excluded from ‘a fair go’, and basic human rights.

People with Disability Australia is uniting Australians with disability to call on government, politicians, the media, business and voters to end protracted and systemic marginalisation: to stop the abuse of people with disability and bring an end to institutions; to increase the number of people with disability in jobs and reduce poverty; to provide people with disability the adequate and appropriate supports we need to live lives of our own choosing by building a sustainable, person centred DisablityCare Australia; and to promote, protect and fulfil our human rights.

The launch of the NDIS on July 1 2013 was a cause for celebration as has been the progressive sign up of all States and Territories as launch sites, with Western Australia reaching agreement on Sunday 4 August 2013. Once realised, the scheme should provide for the structures, workforce and opportunity to significantly improve the lives of thousands of people with disability in Australia.  We applaud the Australian Governments for their work on this critical service system reform that promises to put choice and control firmly in our hands.  We also applaud the bipartisan approach with the Opposition in recognising that this transformation in the provision of disability support is necessary to increase the social and economic participation of Australians with disability. The people of Australia have also been overwhelming in their support for this reform, realising that disability affects everyone, and so everyone should share the responsibility of funding this reform and creating a more equitable society. 

But there is still so much work to be done before the full roll out in 2018. In order to unlock the full potential of the NDIS, ensure its success, and realise the parallel commitment to giving people with disability in Australia a fair go, it is essential that the Government and Opposition commit to the following policy objectives:

Funding for the NDIS is secured and guaranteed in perpetuity: The hypothecated levy will provide certainty to people with disability about funding longevity. While the Productivity Commission identified that the net annual budgetary cost of the NDIS after the national rollout is $6.5 billion, a substantially lower cost to the economy of $1.6 billion annually has also been forecast. With the economic benefits of the NDIS equating to a reduction in budget pressures of around $2.7 billion per year, the secure $3 billion levy funding base will ensure that maintaining supply of the necessary budgetary balance required is manageable.

The Productivity Commission concluded that the scheme would in fact generate a 1% or $32 billion increase in GDP. PWC has estimated that the scheme itself will create over 220,000 jobs.

The paradigm shift to person centred approaches must remain at the forefront across all processes of the NDIS: Every element of the scheme from assessment, planning, support delivery and administrationmust remain centred on outcomes for people with disability not outputs. The fundamental principle that people with disability should be free to maximise choice and control to purchase goods, services and supports from a wide menu of options must not become eroded. Any limitations on choice must be viewed with caution so as to guard against perverse outcomes which reduce control, such as segregated accommodation models.

Establishment of an independent consumer complaints and resolution mechanism with enforcement powers: This is necessary to handle complaints about the NDIS and all registered and non-registered support providers and plan managers. The mechanism must also be equipped to deal with allegations of violence, abuse, neglect and exploitation, either separately or in harmonisation with the National Disability Abuse and Neglect Hotline.

Independent information and advocacy services for people with disability must be adequately funded: the NDIS has recognised that access to independent advocacy and information is key to enabling people with disability to make informed choices and achieve positive outcomes. Organisations must be funded to a level that will enable them to provide this support to all people with disability including marginalised communities such as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples; people living in licenced boarding houses; people who are in contact with the criminal justice system; or people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds.

People with disability and their representative organisations must continue to be involved in and closely consulted on all aspects of the NDIS design, governance, operation, evaluation and amendment: This constant feedback is one key way of ensuring the scheme is working successfully and appropriate improvements are made where necessary. We support the establishment of the joint select committee to monitor implementation of the scheme.

Fully implement the National Disability Strategy (NDS): The success of the NDIS will be hindered if progress in key elements of the NDS are not significantly improved before the full roll out in 2018. (see Make the Convention Real, Implement the National Disability Strategy). For example:

Getting real on jobs: 45% of people with disability in Australia live on or near the poverty line. The NDIS will not provide a solution to this problem in itself, but in providing adequate supports it hopes to increase the economic participation of people with disability. Achieving this requires employment, and we need a new approach which looks at the barriers to employment for people with disability such as negative attitudes and limited opportunity (see Get Real on Jobs).

Stopping abuse: The change in who can provide supports creates greater choice and control for people with disability. However, it also means that new frameworks are required in order to prevent violence, abuse, neglect and exploitation from providers of disability support (see Stop the Abuse).

Fixing infrastructure: the NDIS may provide people with disability the supports they need to live a better life, but their freedoms will still be limited by the inaccessibility of our infrastructure. Buildings and public transport systems must be improved, especially for people in regional and remote areas, so that people with disability can access a wide range of support options and enjoy community participation.  

Key recommendations

  • The NDIS levy to be maintained as a permanent funding source for the National Disability Insurance Scheme.
  • Full funding of the NDIS to the amount recommended by the Productivity Commission and tied to increases in the Consumer Price Index.

 Deliver the NDIS Word 107kb

It is estimated that 20% of Australians are people with a disability. Yet historically, we have been shut out of civic life, the community and jobs. Hindered by negative attitudes, unimaginative programs, and inaccessible transport, buildings and information, people with disability in Australia have been excluded from ‘a fair go’, and basic human rights.

People with Disability Australia is uniting Australians with disability to call on government, politicians, the media, business and voters to end protracted and systemic marginalisation: to stop the abuse of people with disability and bring an end to institutions; to increase the number of people with disability in jobs and reduce poverty; to provide people with disability the adequate and appropriate supports we need to live lives of our own choosing by building a sustainable, person centred DisablityCare Australia; and to promote, protect and fulfil our human rights.

People with disability in Australia have more barriers to a fair go than in almost any other developed country in the world. At the heart of this lies the reality that job prospects for people with disability are dramatically lower than for other people in Australia.

According to the ABS 4102.0 Australian Social Trends, March Quarter 2012 Report, the labour force participation rate for those aged 15-64 years with disability in 2009 was 54%, much lower than that for those without disability (83%). Even the Australian Public Service is guilty of being a poorly performing employer, with the number of employees with disability more than halving over the last 17 years, from 6.6% in 1986 to 3.1% last year.

The most recent OECD ranking placed Australia 21st out of 29 OECD countries for employment participation of people with disability. Mexico and the Slovak Republic are outdoing us. Our accumulated short comings mean that 45% of people with disability in Australia live near or below the poverty line. Australia currently ranks 26 out of 27 OECD countries for the percentage of people with disability living in poverty.

The 2011 Deloitte Access Economics report ‘The Economic Benefits of Increasing Employment for People with Disability’ concluded that Australia would increase its Gross Domestic Project (GDP) by $43 billion if employment rates for people with disability were increased only by one third. The report went on to identify this goal as achievable, perhaps even modest, estimating that a 10% increase in the labour market would equate to an increase of between 191,000 and 203,000 jobs for people with disability.

How to increase the employment levels of people with disability is a question in desperate need of innovative thinking. Tying employment and income support for people with disability together at the Federal level maintains the view that the only levers for change are Newstart or the Disability Support Pension (DSP). This model hasn’t created jobs, hasn’t supported employers to create jobs, hasn’t made workplaces more accessible or removed discrimination, hasn’t created more positive employer attitudes and hasn’t equipped people with disability with the skills or resilience to retain their place in the workforce. Not only has this model not worked, it hasn’t even achieved what it was designed to, which was to reduce the number of people in receipt of the DSP.

We need to look beyond the DSP and beyond trying to parachute people into jobs. We need to look at the real structural barriers to employment which include:

Failure to capitalise on States, Territories and Local Government knowledge and innovation: These levels of Government have local contacts and procure from industries that provide many base level jobs. There is far more that States, Territories and local governments could contribute to solving the employment crisis facing people with disability if disability employment was made a national priority through COAG.

A lack of support for people with disability to access education and training: People with disability are still routinely segregated into special education or special classes within mainstream education despite the overwhelming evidence that this results in lower educational outcomes and lower levels of future economic participation.

Attitudinal barriers of employers: Many employers are reticent to hire people with disability due to a lack of disability awareness and the fear of cost implications. In reality, the reasonable accommodation a person with disability may require to perform a role on an equal basis as others may be as simple as flexible working hours or a magnification facility to read a computer screen. Relying on discrimination law to address our unwelcoming workplaces isn’t working fast enough. We need solid benchmarked quantitative national research into employer attitudes towards people with disability to be able to address the crux of this problem. Employers also need evidence that Government is serious and committed.

Low expectations within Disability Employment Services (DES): DES focus on getting people with disability into jobs, not ensuring that those jobs are retained. Applying the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) model of person centred approaches and giving the individual, rather than the DES, the budget to get the supports they need to break into employment would drive innovation and maximise positive outcomes for people with disability. For example, directly paying a provider to write a CV, a potential employer to make a workplace accessible or buying suitable clothes for an interview.

Financial disincentives to employment for people with disability: For many people the cost of disability (such as taxi fares) means that they can actually be worse off as a result of moving from the DSP into employment, especially if moving into casual employment or a low wage position.

Inaccessible transport and workplaces: Some people with disability are marginalised from the workforce solely because buses are inaccessible, train stations don’t always have lifts and workplaces may not have accessible bathrooms.  

The continued segregation and exploitation of people with disability employed in Australian Disability Enterprises (ADE): People with disability working in ADEs earn lower and sub-award wages than people in mainstream employment – unlike their counterparts in open employment they do not receive equal pay for work of equal value or have access to the same industrial protections as other workers. The wage system used in ADEs has recently been ruled discriminatory by the Federal court.

Key recommendations

  • Bipartisan commitment to creating 200,000 jobs for people with disability by 2023.
  • Increasing targets for employing people with disability in public service positions and key signature measures, such as Parliamentary internships to show we are serious.
  • Reporting on the numbers of people employed by private sector and not for profit organisations required in their annual reports.
  • The adoption of an accessible procurement policy by the Government to preference employers that demonstrate best practise in the employment of people with disability.
  • Retention of full DSP for at least six months for people with disability entering the workforce in entry level positions, to provide real incentives and buffers against perverse outcomes due to extra costs.
  • Comprehensive tax offsets for the costs of mainstream supports people with disability may encounter in order to maintain themselves in jobs (for instance the costs of tailored clothing, taxis or maintaining a car).
  • Transition from the Australia Disabilty Enterprises model to genuine work training and skills building opportunities that lead to open mainstream employment for people with disability.
  • Implementation of the National Disability Strategy.

 Get Real on Jobs Word 102kb

It is estimated that 20% of Australians are people with a disability. Yet historically, we have been shut out of civic life, the community and jobs. Hindered by negative attitudes, unimaginative programs, and inaccessible transport, buildings and information, people with disability in Australia have been excluded from ‘a fair go’, and basic human rights.

People with Disability Australia is uniting Australians with disability to call on government, politicians, the media, business and voters to end protracted and systemic marginalisation: to stop the abuse of people with disability and bring an end to institutions; to increase the number of people with disability in jobs and reduce poverty; to provide people with disability the adequate and appropriate supports we need to live lives of our own choosing by building a sustainable, person centred DisablityCare Australia; and to promote, protect and fulfil our human rights.

The PWDA Alerts come out as an email as short, single issue, immediate messages which are longer than an email but shorter than an E-Bulletin. Alerts might contain disability-related breaking news, developments in the disability sector either at the state, national or international level. 

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2016

2015

2014

2013

Our position papers are grouped below by topic

Housing and Support

Accommodating Human Rights - A Human Rights Perspective on Housing and Support for persons with disability, 2010 - Word 1.96MB

Human Rights

Everyone, everywhere: recognition of persons with disability as persons before the law, 2009 - Word 821kb

NDIS

Securing funding for the NDIS - Word 302kb PDF 244kb

PADP

PADP Community Alliance Position Statement, 2009 - Word 1.45MB

Reproductive Rights

Sterilisation of people with disability, 2012 - Word 63kb

Our Systemic Advocates regularly respond to Government committees and departments on a range of issues affecting people with disability. Below are our submissions listed by year and month. Some submissions from DPO Australia are also listed.

2017

July | Senate Standing Committees on Community Affairs Inquiry into Social Services Legislation Amendment (Ending Carbon Tax Compensation) Bill 2017 Word or PDF

March | Inquiry into the design, scope, cost-benefit analysis, contracts awarded and implementation associated with the Better Management of the Social Welfare System initiative PDF

March | Australian Law Reform Commission Discussion Paper: Protecting the Rights of Older Australians from Abuse (DPOA) Word or PDF

March | Inquiry into Students with a disability or special needs in New South Wales schools Word or PDF

February | NSW Law Reform Commission Review of the Guardianship Act 1987 Question Paper 3: The role of guardians and financial managers - Word

February | NSW Law Reform Commission Review of the Guardianship Act 1987 Question Paper 2: Decision Making Models Word

February | Towards an all abilities Queensland consultation paper Word or PDF

February |  Submission to Consultation regarding a Domestic Violence Disclosure Scheme in Queensland Word

2016

December | Submission to Fifth National Mental Health Plan - Word

November | Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse: Submission regarding Criminal Justice - Word

October | NSW Law Reform Commission Review of the Guardianship Act 1987 Discussion Paper 1: Preconditions for Alternative Decision Making Arrangements - Word

October | Senate Community Affairs Legislation Committee inquiry into Social Services Legislation Amendment (Budget Repair) Bill 2016 - Word or PDF

October | Foundations for Change - Homelessness in NSW submission - Word or PDF

August | Australian Law Reform Commission Issues Paper: Protecting the Rights of Older Australians from Abuse - Word or ALRC website

June | Department of Social Services (DSS): Review of the National Disability Advocacy Program - Word or PDF

May | Department of Communications and the Arts: Communications Accessibility: 2016 and Beyond - Word

April | 2016-17 PWDA Federal Budget Submission - Word or PDF

April | Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse Consultation Paper: Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse In Out of Home Care - PDF

April | Submission to Inquiry into Indefinite Detention of People with Cognitive and Psychiatric Impairment in Australia - Word or PDF

April | National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA): Specialist Disability Accommodation (SDA) Position Paper on Draft Pricing and Payments - Word

April | Australian Cross Disability Alliance Response to Victorian Creating Child Safe Institutions Consultation Paper - Reportable Conduct Scheme - Word

March | Submission to the NSW Law Reform Review of the Guardianship Act - Word or PDF

March | Letter to the ACT Government Reportable Conduct Consultation Paper - Word

March | Letter on the Social Services Legislation Amendment (Miscellaneous Measures) Bill 2015 - Word 

March | Submission to Affordable Housing Working Group Issues Paper - Council on Federal Financial Relations, Social Policy division - Word

February | Submission to the NSW Legislative Council Inquiry into Elder Abuse - Word

February | Submission on Blueprint for Family and Domestic Violence Response in NSW - Word

2015

December | Submission to the Australian Human Rights Commission 'Willing to Work' Enquiry - Word

August | Submission to the NSW Legislative Council Inquiry into Vocational Education and Training

August | Submission to Senate Standing Committee on Education and Employment regarding access and attainment for students with disability in school

August | Australian Cross Disability Alliance submission to the Senate Inquiry into Violence, Abuse and Neglect against People with Disability in Institutional and Residential Settings - Word or PDF
| Personal stories and testimonies (Accompanying document to Australian Cross Disability Alliance submission to Senate Inquiry into Violence, Abuse and Neglect against People with Disability in Institutional and Residential Settings) - Word or PDF
| Opening statement to Senate Inquiry - Word

July | Australian Cross Disability Alliance submission on the review of the National Disability Advocacy Framework

July | Joint submission with Women with Disabilities Australia to the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, Draft General Comment on Article 6: Women with Disabilities

July | Submission in response to an application by the Department of Social Services for an additional exemption from the Disability Discrimination Act 1992 to use the Business Services Wage Assessment Tool in Australian Disability Enterprises

July | Submission to the Australian Human Rights Commission on the Australasian Railway Association's Exemption Applications

July | Submission on the National Disability Employment Framework Issues Paper

June | Domestic Violence Disclosure Scheme Discussion Paper

June | Submission from more than 30 leading Australian academics regarding violence data, coordinated by PWDA and to the Senate Inquiry into Violence, Abuse and Neglect against People with Disability in Institutional and Residential Settings

June | Submission to the National Children's Commissioner's examination of domestic violence and children

JuneSubmission to the NSW Government's Domestic Violence Disclosure Scheme Discussion Paper

JuneReview of the Disability (Access to Premises – Building) Standards 2010

June | Submission to Royal Commission into Institutional Responses to Child Sexual Abuse Issues Paper 8: Experiences of Police and Prosecution Responses

May Proposal for a National Disability Insurance Scheme Quality and Safeguarding framework - Joint submission with Women with Disabilities Australia

May | Submission to the Third Action Plan of the National Framework for Protecting Australia's Children

Mar | Women with Disabilities Australia Submission to Commitee on the Rights of Personals with Disabilities (CRPD) Commitee on the Right to Education

Mar | NSW Department of Justice Discussion on Limitation Periods in Civil Claims for Child Sexual Abuse

FebPWDA 2015 Federal Budget Submission

Feb | Social Housing in NSW: Discussion Paper Work

Feb | Senate Community Affairs Committee Inquiry into the Adequacy of existing residential care arrangements available for young people with severe phsyical, mental or intellectual disabilities in Australia

2014

Dec | NSW Disability Inclusion Plan Consultation 

 Nov| Senate Community Affairs Committee Inquiry into Out of Home Care

Oct | Considerations of the 4th and 5th Reports of Australia by the Committee to the Convention Against Torture 

Sep | Senate Standing Committee on Finance and Public Administration 'Inquiry into Domestic Violence in Australia' - (Australian Cross Disability Alliance)

Aug | People with Disability Australia (PWDA) Disability Employment Services (DES) Consumer Engagement Project

Aug | Senate Standing Committee on Community Affairs References Committee Inquiry into the extent of income inequality in Australia 

Aug | Submission to the consultation on the Interim Report on Welfare Reform 

Aug | NSW Legislative Assembly Public Accounts Committee Inquiry into tenancy management in social housing 

Jul | Submission to the Senate Standing Committee on Community Affairs inquiry into the Business Services Wage Assessment Tool Payment Scheme Bill 

Jul | Social Services and Other Legislation Amendment (2014 Budget Measures No. 1) Bill 2014 and Social Services and Other Legislation Amendment (2014 Budget Measures No. 2) Bill 2014 

Jul | Comments and Recommendations in Response to the Consultation Paper: Developing a new disability strategy for Australia’s Aid Program 2015-2020 

Jul | Submissions to Australian Law Reform Commission (ALRC): Equality, Capacity and Disability in Commonwealth Laws, Discussion Paper May 2014

Apr | Membership engagement report to The Department of Social Services (DSS) regarding the implementation of the National Disability Strategy 2010-2020 

Apr | Submission to Senate Economic References Committee Inquiry into Affordable Housing 

Mar | Submission to Legislative Council Select Committee Inquiry into Social, Public and Affordable Housing 

Feb | Joint submission to the CRPD on the Draft General Comment on Article 12 of the Convention - Equal Recognition before the Law
Word or PDF 

Feb | Submission to the Senate Inquiry into the prevalence of different types of speech, language and communication disorders and speech pathology services in Australia 

Feb | NSW Disability Inclusion Bill 2014 

Feb | Joint supplementary response regarding Dept of Social Security (DSS) application for exemption from the Disability Discrimination Act 1992 to use the Business Services Wage Assessment Tool (BSWAT)
Word or PDF

Jan | Joint response regarding Dept of Social Security (DSS) application for exemption from the Disability Discrimination Act 1992 to use the Business Services Wage Assessment Tool (BSWAT) 
Word or PDF

Jan | PWDA Submission regarding Review of equal recognition before the law and legal capacity for people with disability 

2013

Oct | PWDA Submission regarding DSS application for exemption in relation to the use of the Business Services Wage Assessment Tool (BSWAT) 

Aug | PWDA Submission to Access to justice in the criminal justice system for people with disability 

Apr | PWDA Submission on the Draft Boarding House Regulation 2013 and associated Regulatory Impact Statement 

Mar | PWDA Submission to the Inquiry into the involuntary or coerced sterilisation of people with disabilities in Australia  

Mar | PWDA Submission regarding the Exposure Draft Boarding Houses Bill 2012 

Mar | PWDA Submission regarding the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) Rules Consultation Paper 

Feb | PWDA Submission to NSW Government Discussion Paper on the Reform of the NSW  Disability Services Act 1987 

Feb | Improving the Employment Participation of People with Disability in Australia 

Jan | Senate Community Affairs Legislation Committee: The National Disability Insurance Scheme Bill 2012 

2012

Apr | Mid-Term Review of the AusAID Strategy: Development for All - Towards a Disability-Inclusive Australian Aid Program 2009 -2014 

Jan | Consolidation of Commonwealth Anti-Discrimination Laws 

2011

Nov | NSW Attorney General and Justice's review of the Crimes (Domestic and Personal Violence) Act 2007 

Oct | Senate Education Employment and Workplace Relations Committee Inquiry into the administration and purchasing of Disability Employment Services in Australia

Sep | NSW Legislative Council Standing Committee on Social Issues Inquiry into Domestic violence trends and issues in NSW PDF only

Jul | Exposure Draft of the ‘Supported Accommodation Innovation Fund’ 

May | Interim Report by the Productivity Commission into Disability Care and Support 

Apr | Joint Submission NEDA and PWDA: Productivity Commission Inquiry into Disability Care and Support 

2010

Dec | Inquiry into the Commonwealth Commissioner for Children and Young People Bill 2010 

Aug | Inquiry into services provided or funded by Ageing, Disability and Home Care 

Aug | Submission: Productivity Commission Inquiry into Long Term Disability Care and Support 

Jul | Public consultation on proposed Youth and Community  Services Regulation 

Jul | Stronger Together Consultation 

Jul | Review of the National Standards for Disability Services

Jul | Summary Submission: Productivity Commission Inquiry on Disability Care and Support 

Feb | Inquiry into the provision of education to students with a disability or special needs 

2009

Dec | Response to the Inquiry into the NSW Taxi Industry 

Nov | RACGP - Review of Standards for General Practice - Joint Submission 

Sep | Everyone, everywhere: recognition of persons with disability as persons before the law

Aug | NSW Legislative Council's Inquiry into Substitute decision-making for people lacking capacity - Joint Submission 

Jul | NGO Shadow Report on Women's Human Rights

Jun | National Human Rights Consultation 

Mar | Draft Disability (Access to Premises - Buildings) Standards 

Links to a range of brochures, both in Word and PDF formats, about our services are located below.

 Individual Advocacy Service (IAS) Brochures - Word Documents 

 Individual Advocacy Service (IAS) Brochures for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (ATSI) people - Word Documents

Individual Advocacy Service (IAS) Brochures in Community Languages - Word Documents

PWDA Complaints Brochure - Word Documents

Service Brochures for people with disability living in boarding houses - Word Documents

Individual Advocacy Service (IAS) Brochures - PDFs

Individual Advocacy Service (IAS) Brochures for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (ATSI) people - PDFs

Individual Advocacy Service (IAS) Brochures in Community Languages - PDFs

PWDA Complaints Brochure - PDFs

Service Brochures for people with disability living in boarding houses - PDFs

Below are links to all our publications, resources, brochures, reports and submissions.

  • Alerts - explore the archive short email alerts we have sent to our members.
  • Annual report archive - browse our current and past annual reports.
  • Brochures - download and print off brochures about our services.
  • Newsletter- access an archive of internal news and developments in the disability sector at the state, national and international levels.
  • Guide to Reporting Disability - downloada short primer on respectful language when talking to, referring to or working with people with disability.
  • Position Statements - learn more about PWDA's positions on key issues affecting people with disability
  • Reports - access published research and papers regarding disability.
  • Submissions - see submissions to Government inquiries, discussion papers and more.

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